Out of the Vault: Child’s Charro Suit

Posted on August 10, 2021 by Seth "from Marketing" Spillman in

Welcome again to “Out of the Vault.” This is our blog series where we take you behind-the-scenes to show off our newest acquisitions and why we think they are an important addition to the Museum’s mission to tell you the diverse stories of the West.

Did you know that the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum preserves more than amazing art and artifacts in our vault? Michael Grauer, McCasland Chair of Cowboy Culture/Curator of Cowboy Culture and Western Art, just found this child’s Charro Suit and knew it would be an excellent addition to the Museum’s collection.

WHAT IS THIS?

This is a boy’s charro suit, probably hand-made in the 1980s. The formal black charro suit was adopted for special events by charro societies in Mexico by the 1920s. The black charro suit is a direct descendant of the influence of Emperor Maximilian of Mexico who brought European styling to Mexico during his reign in the 1860s.

WHERE DID WE GET IT?

We purchased this suit from an antiques store in Las Vegas, New Mexico, which had the suit for several years.

WHY DID WE ACQUIRE IT?

We acquired it to expand our ability to tell a broader, more inclusive cowboy story. The black charro suit is a the perfect companion to a boys leather charro suit from the 1870s that’s already in our collection. Its acquisition shows the continuing and evolving story of the vaquero/cowboy across the Americas.

WHEN CAN I SEE IT ON DISPLAY?

After the charro suit is properly researched and catalogue, plans are underway to feature this new acquisition in the Museum’s galleries in the next several months.

The Western Heritage Fund helps make acquisitions like this possible. The West is full of different cultures, peoples and stories, and you can help us share those stories.

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