Current Exhibitions

Hollywood and the American West

February 3 – May 14, 2017

New Yorker. Paul Newman reading The New Yorker on the set of The Left Handed Gun. 1958. John R. Hamilton/John Wayne Enterprises.

Candid, intimate, and raw, these photographs showcase private access to the greatest movie stars, musicians, and directors of all time. Subjects include John Wayne, Natalie Wood, Ann-Margret, John Ford, Gregory Peck, Paul Newman, Kirk Douglas, Bing Crosby, Danny Glover, Kevin Costner, and more. Organized by John Wayne Enterprises and the John R. Hamilton Archives.

Exhibit Support:

The Oklahoma Gazette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Yard of Turkey Red: The Western Bandanna

February 3 – May 14, 2017

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Many a 19th-century cowboy bought a square yard of Turkey red cloth at the local mercantile and proudly tied it around his neck. The bright red material derived its name from the traditional Turkish process of dying cotton fabric. A rare collection of period bandannas provides Museum visitors a glimpse of authentic neckwear once sought after by young horsemen on the range and later popularized in Western fiction.

Exhibit Support:

The Oklahoma Gazette

 

 

 

 

Power and Prestige Children’s Gallery

February 3 – May 14, 2017

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Designed to complement the temporary exhibition Power and Prestige: Headdresses of the American Plains, the Museum offers a fun activity space to explore bravery, pageantry, artistry, community, and respect for culture and diversity. The Power and Prestige Children’s Gallery offers dramatic scenes and stories, a mapping journey, a story station reading area, make-and-take activity areas, and continuous programming to engage children to explore on their own, in small groups, or as a family.

Power and Prestige: Headdresses of the American Plains and related programs made possible, in part, by grants from Bank of America, and from the Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and Ann S. Alspaugh. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibitions and program do not necessarily represent those of OHC or NEH.

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Exhibit Support:

The Oklahoma Gazette

 

 

The Artistry of the Western Paperback

January 21 – May 14, 2017

Ghostly Hoofbeats. Norman A. Fox. Dell Publishing: New York, 1952. Glenn D. Shirley Western Americana Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. RC2006.068.1.07806.
Ghostly Hoofbeats. Norman A. Fox. Dell Publishing: New York, 1952. Glenn D. Shirley Western Americana Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. RC2006.068.1.07806.

During the 1940s and 1950s, book illustrators created dynamic and engaging paperback covers for western tales of cowboys, villains, duels, and danger. They might not have been sold in galleries or taken months to complete, but they remain testaments to talent and skill. Study the works of A. Leslie Ross, Robert Stanley, George Gross, Stanley Borack, Tom Ryan, and Frank McCarthy, and decide: is it art or something else? Does it belong on a bookshelf, on exhibit, or both? On display through May 14, 2017.

 

Exhibit Support:

The Oklahoma Gazette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Power and Prestige: Headdresses of the American Plains

August 26, 2016 – May 14, 2017

Ring-Neck Pheasant Feather Headdress
North American Great Plains, Lakota.
Ca. 1900, feathers, felt, porcupine quills, hackles, cotton, sinew.
1983.07.01

War bonnets are an iconic image of the American West, yet the truth behind these emblematic items is more complex than the name would indicate. Going back centuries, feather headdresses played a formalized role in both war and ritual with large and subtle variants in style, use, and design.  This exhibit explores the history and development of the Native American bonnet with a particular emphasis on the “flared” style—the most recognizable and commonly worn North American Great Plains bonnet.  Headdresses, ledger art, and photographs from the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s permanent collection, as well as headdresses from the Gilcrease Museum and the Oklahoma History Center, will be on display.

Funding for Power and Prestige: Headdresses of the American Plains and related student programs is provided, in part, by a grant from the Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibitions and program, do not necessarily represent those of OHC or NEH.

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Sponsored in part by:

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and

Lowell Ellsworth Smith: My Theology of Painting

May 27, 2016 – July 9, 2017

LE Smith Exhibit
Church Façade, Plaza del Oriente. Lowell Ellsworth Smith, 1983, watercolor on board. 1983.48. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

Ohio watercolorist and Prix de West winner, Lowell Ellsworth Smith (1924-2008), once referenced his theology of painting during an interview. Short but meaningful, the phrase summarized his relationship with art. It was more than a hobby or pastime. More than a career. It was the lens through which he saw and experienced the world.

Lowell Ellsworth Smith: My Theology of Painting explores this personal process and approach. Featuring watercolor studies and Smith’s own words and observations, it introduces the man, his methods, and his belief in the power and potential of creative energy. He lived for the moment and painted what he saw and as importantly, what he felt, leaving something of himself in each of his works. With Smith’s guidance, visitors will learn to recognize him.

 

 

 

 

Plan your visit today!