Out of the Archives: Dogs!

Posted on August 31, 2021 by Dickinson Research Center in

Because there is no bad day to show off some dogs, we’re showcasing some of the many dogs that can be found in the Museum’s historical collections! All of these good boys, these best puppers, can be found in the Dickinson Research Center’s archival collections. Bow WOW!

Spot is here to save the day! This hardworking dog is absolutely a good boy. 

Chief Fireman & Dog. Henry Madison Wantland, circa 1915, dry plate negative. Robert E. Cunningham Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 2000.005.0927. 

This Nanny Dog is guarding their charge AND showing off the best way to crawl!  

Baby crawling near lying dog with porch and house in the background. Unknown, circa 1900, silver gelatin print. William N. Pirtle Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 1995.039.72C. 

It’s a tough job, being Napmaster General, but this dog obviously has it under control. 

Carte de Visite single portrait of a young Girl lying on floor with dog. Henry Madison Wantland, circa 1910, dry plate negative. Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 2000.005.2.0243. 

 

Stuck walking on icy roads? You need a guide dog like this little kid! A good boy, doing good work. 

Steward, B.C. Unknown, circa 1915, silver gelatin print. Joe de Yong/Richard J. Flood Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 1980.018.576.073. 

 

He’s only on the left edge of the image, but this good boy has a stick in his mouth and is ready to play! He’s absolutely allowed to photobomb all of our family portraits. 

Pima Agency, Arizona, April 1902. Arthur M. Tinker, 1902, albumen print. Arthur M. Tinker Photographic Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 2001.077.88. 

 

Doing tricks and making friends – the goodest boy at the rodeo! Betty obviously approves. 

Betty Willis – Colt & Dog. Devere Helfrich, 1947, safety film negative. Devere Helfrich Rodeo Photographic Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 81.023.02607. 

 

Our collective hearts just melted at the sight of this best boy. Look at how he is with his person! 

Single portrait of Dr. W.C. Whittenberg sitting with dog. Henry Madison Wantland, circa 1916, dry plate negative. Robert E. Cunningham Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 2000.005.3.0124A. 

 

This Junie Bug can fly! Look at her go, the little rocket.

Buster’s dog, Junie Bug. Devere Helfrich, 1966, safety film negative. Devere Helfrich Rodeo Photographic Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 81.023.27927-12. 

 

 

A tiny puppy! Look at how little he is next to the Coke bottle! If it were possible to pull a puppy out of a photograph, Hercules here would be our top pick. 

Hercules Decker. Devere Helfrich, 1966, safety film negative. Devere Helfrich Rodeo Photographic Collection, Dickinson Research Center, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 81.023.27745-08. 

 

Do you know how they say people start looking like their pups? Don’t know who that guy is, but Lucy, the dog, is about to start doing our social media.

About The Dickinson Research Center (DRC)

The Donald C. & Elizabeth M. Dickinson Research Center (DRC) houses the Museum’s archival and photographic collections, institutional records and library. It shares the Museum’s mission to preserve and interpret the evolving history and cultures of the American West through exhibitions, education, research, and publications.

The collections span centuries and include over 42,000 books; 700,000 photographs; dime novels, manuscripts, maps, film posters, movies and more. Not limited to the old West, they also cover the modern authors, directors and artists inspired by it. Main subject areas include general western history, rodeo history, Native American history, western popular culture, western art and ranching.

Research

The Dickinson Research Center is open to the public by appointment from 10:00AM to 4:00PM, Monday through Friday. To schedule an appointment, contact us at askarchives@nationalcowboymuseum.org

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